Write a Movie in 30 Days – Perk Version!

I love running sessions for Write a Movie in 30 Days. Since Covid-19 arrived, these sessions have been online rather than in person but they’ve still sometimes been in front of quite large audiences. The newly-announced sessions are a little different: online classrooms of ten (at most) and the only way to get a ticket right now is to back Powertool Cheerleaders vs the Boyband of the Screeching Dead.

Yes, tickets to the online classroom are being made available as a perk when you support the movie.

Powertool Cheerleaders vs the Boyband of the Screeching Dead

Five kick-ass cheerleaders carrying assorted heavy weaponry

So, last week we launched a Kickstarter for our new movie and by Saturday night we were the MOST POPULAR FILM KICKSTARTER IN THE WORLD.

Out of 74,563.

Bloody hell.

Five kick-ass cheerleaders carrying assorted heavy weaponry

Powertool Cheerleaders vs the Boyband of the Screeching Dead is a movie I’ve wanted to make for my whole life. It’s big and loud and gory and funny and musical(!) and it’s being made by a wonderful team of people who are doing it for the love of it.

Not gonna lie. Eight years or so ago, I had a major wobble about my film career.

When I started out, I’d intended to make fun midnight movies. My first film, TrashHouse, was an attempt to capture that crazy, eccentric vibe. I thought it might end up being the only film I ever made so I threw everything at it. We had monsters, weapons, retro fashions, stupid one-liners and it was the best thing I could have put together at the time.

2004 was a tough time to be making movies; celluloid was still the ruler, digital was frowned upon or not even thought about. Micro-budget flicks were thin on the ground, and the year TrashHouse came out it was one of only 16 British horror features released that year (according to the figures of the mighty MJ Simpson) because the technology really wasn’t there yet.

And it really WASN’T there. I cut the film on a 20GB hard drive. There was nowhere to research when you didn’t know how to do something, as this was in the days before YouTube and all the OLD instructions about how to do stuff were based on celluloid not DV.

As a result, bits of TrashHouse look… What’s the word? Well, they look shit.

They didn’t look great in 2004, and in 2020 they just look painful. But you know what TrashHouse got right?

It got the spirit right.

It was nuts and ambitious and it was edited on a 20GB hard drive and yet it somehow got into every Blockbuster in the UK. 

In the years that followed, I started to take narratives a bit more seriously. I made films with a bit more craftmanship and possibly a more focused intent. When my fourth feature, The Devil’s Music, got the best critical reviews of my career I started looking more carefully at the ‘respectable’ screenwriting side of things and the possibilities of moving away from blood-up-the-walls midnight movies.

And then along came Strippers vs Werewolves, the worst professional experience of my entire life and something that drained the fun out of midnight movies for me altogether.

As always, I need to add the disclaimer that the horrific nature of working on Strippers vs Werewolves was in no way the fault of either the director (the brilliant and talented Jonathan Glendening) or the unfortunate man tasked with rewriting my script on an almost daily basis (Phill Barron). The project became misery incarnate, and left not only a sour taste in my mouth but also a growing feeling that I no longer wanted anything to do with the industry I’d once dreamed of being a part of.

I had a major wobble.

I pivoted a bit, shifting my focus to talking about movies on stages at festivals (and at TEDx) rather than actually directing anything. I continued writing, optioning scripts to third parties, and doing rewrites on other people’s projects. My filmmaking from 2015-2020 consisted of shooting an arthouse micro-micro-micro-budget horror movie then destroying it at the premiere and endlessly recutting, reshaping and reimagining it before showing it to a handful of people and starting the process again. I’d lost something, and I had no way of knowing whether I’d ever get it back.

And then came this tweet.

Rather than ditching my fledgling script (which was way more like a ‘funny title’ than an actual draft) I started chatting to Charlie about it. And, over the course of two years, it actually became something that I not only wanted to film but something I was DESPERATE to film.

The ultimate midnight movie.

A horror/musical/comedy with a brilliant and talented cast, a load of great songs and a defiantly independent spirit.

Something with a brain, a heart and an AWFUL lot of blood.

Last month we shot a promo. It was masked, distanced and a ridiculous amount of fun regardless.

Look, since the dizzying heights of the weekend, the Kickstarter traffic has dropped massively. That always happens in the second week of a Kickstarter, apparently, but JESUS it’s depressing. If you’ve got any interest in seeing this sucker onscreen (or even just seeing our promo video!) head over to the Kickstarter right now. If you could back us (even a quid!) that would be amazing. If you can’t afford it, a share or an RT would be brilliant too.

Once you recover from a wobble, all you want to do is get back on the horse and ride.

It would mean the world if you helped us make this project a crazy, blood-up-the-walls, big-hearted reality.